Category: Special Programming

Bookgarteners: Lois Ehlert

For an overview of the Bookgarteners program, please visit this post.

Lois Ehlert is one of my favorite author/illustrators of all time. Her book Color Zoo is the first book I remember my school librarian reading to my kindergarten class.

Group Program

To begin our program, I explained what an author was and what an illustrator was. I talked about how each book has one of each. Sometimes they are the same person and sometimes they are not. I had both options to show the kids — Color Zoo and Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. Then, we looked at her biography title The Scraps Book: Notes from a Colorful Life to learn how she makes her pictures. We didn’t read the whole title, but I shared some parts with the group.

Afterwards, it was time to read Chicka Chicka Boom Boom together.

Retelling Tree for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
2.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, retell familiar stories with three or more key events

I bought the Chicka Chicka Activity Tree from Lakeshore Learning. (I had this at my previous library and really missed having one.) This was perfect for this retelling activity. I gave each kid a letter and they waited for their turn to come up and put their letter on the tree, just like in the story.


Activity Stations

Four activity stations were spread out around the room. I had one teen volunteer in the room with me to help control the flow of kiddos.

Sensory Bin with Growing Vegetable Soup
19.A.ECa: Engage in active play using gross-motor and fine-motor skills.

This sensory bin was inspired by Mom Envy, via Pinterest. This activity was very easy for me to put together. I already had purchased the vegetables & garden supplies back when I did the Garden Shop play center. I did buy the colored rice instead of making it, but I have already used the rice a couple of times since…so an excellent purchase. My rice did accidentally transfer dye to hands though, so be aware. (It wiped clean with a sani-hands wipe.)


Pattern Matching with A Pair of Socks
8.A.ECa: Sort, order, compare, and describe objects according to characteristics or attributes.

This pattern matching activity came from Laugh, Paint, Create!, via Pinterest. The kids matched up the socks that I cut out of cardstock. This was a quick station, but they really enjoyed it.


Shape Art with Color Zoo & Color Farm
9.A.ECa: Recognize and name common two- and three- dimensional shapes and describe some of their attributes.
25.A.ECd: Visual Arts. Investigate and participate in activities using visual arts materials.

This art project came from Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas, via Pinterest. This station took them a really long time to complete since I did not precut anything, but their creations were AMAZING. I did have to spend some time with one particular kiddo who had a hard time with their shapes not being perfect. It was a chance to talk about how even my shapes aren’t perfect and that’s okay.


Tangram Flowers for Planting a Rainbow
9.A.ECd: Combine two-dimensional shapes to create new shapes.
9.A.Ede: Think about/imagine how altering the spatial orientation of a shape will change how it looks.

This math activity came from Waddlee-ah-chaa, via Pinterest. This took a fair bit of time to set up. I had to purchase a tangram set and then build my flowers from there. I created the tangrams in Publisher, and they don’t 100% line-up with the pieces, but it was close enough for the kids to use the sheets as a guide to build and that was the whole goal to begin with.


Wrap-Up

I think the only adjustment I would have made with this program was to make the socks matching more difficult by making more socks. They zipped through the activity quickly…but that was because my hand got tired of cutting out socks during program prep, haha. Another successful edition of Bookgarteners.

Bookgarteners: Eric Carle

For an overview of the Bookgarteners program, please visit this post.

I started with Eric Carle because it was an easy marketing approach to get families interested in attending the program. Carle is recognizable and universally adored.

Group Program

To begin our program, I explained what an author was and what an illustrator was. I talked about how each book has one of each. Sometimes they are the same person and sometimes they are not. I had both options to show the kids — The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear. Then, we watched this YouTube video featuring an interview with Eric Carle. It was important to me that the kids “see” the author/illustrator we were talking about.

Then, we read The Very Hungry Caterpillar together. And that led us into our retelling activity afterwards:


Sequencing with The Very Hungry Caterpillar
2.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, retell familiar stories with three or more key events.

This retelling activity came from School Time Snippets, via Pinterest. The templates and instructions are available at the original blog post. I prepped each of these paint sticks and attached all of the paper cut outs to clothespins using hot glue. This was an UNDERTAKING. But it was a big payoff. Patrons walked around the library showing other patrons and signups definitely increased. On the other hand, I have not done such a project since.


Activity Stations

Four activity stations were spread out around the room. I had one teen volunteer in the room with me to help control the flow of kiddos.


Pompom Matching with Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See?
12.C.ECa: Identify, describe, and compare the physical properties of objects.

This color matching activity came from No Time for Flash Cards, via Pinterest. I didn’t want to spend a ton of money buying several sets of magnets, so I reversed it. I made little discs of each character to insert into a muffin tin and instead provided pompoms and tweezers to match the pompoms to the character. This was probably their favorite station at this event.



Rubber Duck Counting with Ten Little Rubber Ducks
6.A.ECe: Differentiate numerals from letters and recognize some single-digit written numerals.

This activity was inspired by Pre-K Pages, via Pinterest. Instead of rolling a dice, I wrote the numerals for each number (1-5), as well as words (one-five) on the bottom of the ducks and set up a duck pond in the corner using our sand/water table and a water-absorbing activity mat. Kids could pull out a duck and match it to their sheet (shown in the picture; the other side has the words written out). Once they found all ten ducks, they “finished” the station though many of them kept pulling out ducks.



Tissue Paper Stars with Draw Me a Star
25.A.ECd: Visual Arts. Investigate and participate in activities using visual arts materials.

This activity was inspired by Karen & Kim 2 Soul Sisters, via Pinterest. I printed a star out on white cardstock and let the kids glue tissue paper squares down onto the star before cutting it out. I was tickled pink when one of the kiddos made the connection that Eric Carle used tissue paper in the video we watched! I was so hoping they would make that connection and was prepared to point it out to them if I had to.



Paper Plate Lacing with The Very Busy Spider
19.A.ECd: Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.

This lacing activity came from Kidz Activities, via Pinterest. I just cut slits into the paper plates since I had both preschoolers and kindergarteners. It worked a lot better for us. This was the station that my volunteer wound up manning for the entire program.


Wrap-Up

I would 100% do this entire program all over again. The few adjustments I would make: find a way to get the water warmer — it was so cold after sitting out for a while, start prepping the caterpillar retelling sticks earlier in the week. Overall, I was really happy with the program and so were patrons.

Bookgarteners: Overview

An illustrated classroom with two adults (one female, one male) reading to children.

The creation of Bookgarteners came from a lot of different factors:

  • Most of the schools are now doing full-day kindergarten. Only one district does half-day. Which means that my preschool storytime is not supporting those K learners.
  • Many of the caregivers had begun requesting preschool/kindergarten programming in the afternoons.
  • I wanted to plan preschool/kindergarten programming to support state early learning standards. Illinois’s early learning standards are available online.
  • I really wanted to make caregivers aware of their ability to support the state early learning standards.
  • And I, personally, needed to do something new and exciting…other than a storytime.

(I think it’s really okay to say that you need to do something other than a storytime. Storytime is GREAT, of course, but early literacy is more than storytime. We are more than storytime.)

So, what IS Bookgarteners?

It’s a forty-five minute author/illustrator study program for ages 3-6. I choose a different author each class and plan different activities around their books. The first fifteen minutes are devoted to learning about the author, reading one of the author’s books, and then re-telling that story as a class. The second fifteen minutes, the kids are invited to go through activity stations on their own direction. The last fifteen minutes, caregivers are invited to join their kids for more activity station time.

Afterwards, everyone gets a take-home brochure and activity packet. The activity packet includes stuff like scissor practice paper, matching games, draw your owns, and more — much of this is taken from pages offered on the author’s website!

Two pieces of paper, one being a take-home packet and the other being a folded brochure.

The aforementioned Take-Home activities and Brochure.

At the end of the brochure, I have this summary available for caregivers:

Bookgarteners was developed to help preschool children and kindergarteners practice the early learning standards for the state of Illinois. This will help prepare preschool children for school and will re-enforce the skills for kindergarteners.

Each activity chosen supports one of the state’s learning standards, but each activity is also designed to be fun and engaging for the children. Their learning really presents best as play at this age.

In addition, in Bookgarteners we are working on other learning standards like interacting with peers, following directions, participating in group activities, and more.

Together, we are growing their minds!

I’ve done six Bookgarteners programs since this spring. I have three more planned for this Winter. The authors I’ve done thus far are: Eric Carle, Lois Ehlert, Donald Crews, Karen Beaumont, Mem Fox, and Mo Willems. Up for this winter are Jan Brett, Ezra Jack Keats, and Herve Tullet. (Currently in the planning stages for spring with Kevin Henkes, Christian Robinson, Jan Thomas on the list!)

The program has been very successful for all of the targets I’ve set for myself. Attendance was slow to start, but has picked up and the fall classes’ registrations were all full. I hope it continues for the winter session!

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish

The was a program from TWO years ago. I just wanted to make sure to post it during a good time for upcoming Seuss celebrations!

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish!: a celebration of Seuss for ages 3-7 and their families.

Storytime

I read an abbreviated version of “One Fish, Two Fish” to start off the program. But personally, I find most Seuss books to be too long for a storytime situation. Then, I pulled out our brand-new (at the time) iPad.

seussapps

Dr. Seuss apps!
“The Cat In the Hat Camera”
“Dr. Seuss Band”
“Green Eggs and Ham”

Since I knew all the kids would want to play with the iPad the second it appeared, our first app was “Dr. Seuss Band.” It’s kind of like DDR for your finger. The kids had fun making noise, but this app would have been frustrating if I hadn’t spent time ahead unlocking some of the instruments and songs.

Next up, I let the app of “Green Eggs and Ham” play, but I turned the reader off so that I could read the story. The kids were giving me rapt attention, and many of the older ones joined in on the “I will not green eggs and ham, I will not eat them, Sam-I-Am!” chorus.

We took a break from the iPad to play The Lorax flannelboard game. I used a giant blow-up dice for this and the kids had a great time as we built the lorax.

Afterwards, it was time to take pictures with “The Cat In the Hat Camera” app. Lots of goofy face, lots of giggles.

Now, was it necessary to use the apps? No, not really. In previous years, we’ve done pictures with a stand-up Cat In the Hat and kids liked that just as much. But technology in my old library’s community was scarce and a lot of kids weren’t exposed to it at all. This was a chance to let them touch and play with an iPad and get them ready for school.

Craft & Games

The second half of the program involved a lot of options. Kids could decide to go to the table and make a Seuss craft:

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Or they could go Dr. Seuss bowling:

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Or they could sit down and read some of the few Dr. Seuss books that were in that day. Or they could play The Lorax dice game again. Or take their time and play with the apps.

Almost every kids chose to go bowling first, followed by the craft. A few kids trickled over to me for help with the apps and a few kids went ended up on the storytime rug with their own Dr. Seuss book.

Overall, everyone had a really great time at this program and I had started to plan our Seuss celebration for the next year — including buying “Thing One” and “Thing Two” decals for a co-worker and I to wear. Leaving my old library the week before the 2014 Seuss Celebration was one of the saddest things for me.

But I hope this gives you some ideas for your own Seuss celebration!

Explore the World: Snow

In response to the STEAM movement (and with great thanks to such great inspiration & encouragement from colleagues: Amy, Abby, and Kendra), this past fall I started a STEAM storytime series at the library. This is primarily aimed at preschoolers and their families, registration open to ages 3-7 in our library.

exploretheworld

Books & Group Activities

Opening Activity
Building blocks from Kendra.
“Building Blocks”
(Tune of Good Night Ladies)
Hello ________
Hello ________
Hello ________
Come build something with your blocks!

Books

snowscience

The First Day of Winter by Denise Fleming
Over and Under the Snow by Kate Messner
Winter Is for Snow by Robert Neubecker

I think the most successful book for this day was “The First Day of Winter” — the kids were very into the cumulative nature of the book and it definitely held their attention.

Station Activities


Snow Painting
I brought snow in from outside. I put it in giant plastic bins (that normally housed our cushions for storytime) and let the kids paint with watercolors in the snow. This station BLEW their minds. I don’t think that any of the kids had ever thought that it was possible to paint with snow. I heard a lot of good conversations as to why the snow worked like water.


Mixing “Snow”
Using cornstarch and shaving cream, the kids made snow dough. I found out about this on Kendra. This is obviously a station full of mess, but another station that the kids thoroughly enjoyed. I had parents tell me that the dough lasted for a couple of plays after the program — I gave each kid a ziplock bag to take their dough home. This was a great trial and error experiment for the kids. They had to figure out which ingredient they needed more of to make a consistent dough.


Marshmallow Snowmen
I also took this station from Kendra. I put out a bunch of toothpicks, paper, glue, marshmallows, cotton balls, etc. and let the kids build their own snowmen. I spent a good deal of time during the introduction of the stations to remind parents that these were crafting marshmallows and that they were not meant for eating! I had a few kids that didn’t want to get their hands messy, so this station was a lot better for them.


Spin-a-Snowman
This was a flannelboard made by a predecessor. It has a little spinner and tells the kids what parts to add to the snowman. We played it as a group during the storytime session and I left it out during the station activities. Honestly, I so didn’t need it! The kids were more than happy to keep rotating between the first three stations.

Take-Home

My book display for this program:

And my handouts: which included an activity page, booklist, and a coloring page.

This is my official last Explore the World post! I did this last winter before I left my old library. I just felt like holding off the post until it was actual winter again.

And a Pinterest friendly image!

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Explore the World: Size

In response to the STEAM movement (and with great thanks to such great inspiration & encouragement from colleagues: Amy, Abby, and Kendra), this past fall I started a STEAM storytime series at the library. This is primarily aimed at preschoolers and their families, registration open to ages 3-7 in our library.

exploretheworld

Books & Group Activities

Opening Activity
Building blocks from Kendra.
“Building Blocks”
(Tune of Good Night Ladies)
Hello ________
Hello ________
Hello ________
Come build something with your blocks!

Books

size-science

Life-Size Zoo by Teruyuki Komiya
Measuring Penny by Loreen Leedy
Size: Many Ways to Measure by Michele Koomen

Station Activities


Puppet Measuring
I put out a dozen of our puppets and had the kids practice measure and compare the sizes of the animals. Some of the kids lined them up in size order, others wrote down their measurements on scrap pieces of paper. I should have had a worksheet made and printed, but I didn’t think about it until I was at the program. (And yes, I visited IKEA and had each of my family members take a measuring tape at every station that we passed. To be fair, we wound up purchasing over $5,000 of furniture between the three households! It should be no surprise that I needed more bookcases.)


Balance Scales
At this station, I challenged the kids to be able to get the scale to balance using different materials. One of my kids spent the whole time here, playing with popsicle sticks and pipe cleaners and various other supplies, creating a balanced scaled over and over again.

Lego Station
Kids can challenge one another to build the highest tower using no more than twenty blocks. Since it was mostly preschoolers at this event, I found that a lot of them just stacked the same sized blocks one on top of another instead of hunting for bigger blocks or creating a base or anything. So, it was a meh station in my opinion since it didn’t accomplish what I wanted it to — but they love Legos!


How Do You Measure Up?
At this station, kids measured themselves on the wall with the help of a parent or librarian to see how they measured up to animals. I was totally inspired by our local zoo — they have tons of interactive displays where kids can see how they measure up to animals. I didn’t get quite as creative as Brookfield, I just put an animal picture bar on the side and marked where the animals would be. The kids walked around the programming room, introducing themselves to other kids: “I’m baby dolphin sized!” This was by far my favorite station.


3-D Rainbow Art
I really wanted an art station that required the kids to do the measuring to create. I found this amazing rainbow craft at Free Kids Crafts and knew that this is what we’d be doing. The kids measured and cut each strip (you can see my example strips in the picture), put them in order and stapled each end.

Take-Home

As always, I had a book display and a take-home packet for my families. I also let them take home the measuring tapes that I had left-over since my plan was just to recycle the extras.

And for you guys, a Pinterest friendly picture:

Explore the World: Magnets

In response to the STEAM movement (and with great thanks to such great inspiration & encouragement from colleagues: Amy, Abby, and Kendra), this past fall I started a STEAM storytime series at the library. This is primarily aimed at preschoolers and their families, registration open to ages 3-7 in our library.

exploretheworld

Books & Group Activities

Opening Activity
Building blocks from Kendra.
“Building Blocks”
(Tune of Good Night Ladies)
Hello ________
Hello ________
Hello ________
Come build something with your blocks!

Books

magnetscience

A Look at Magnets by Barbara Alpert
Push and Pull! Learn About Magnets by Julia Vogel

I shared just a few books today about magnets. I think the best thing that I did was use two magnets for a demonstration where I invited each child up to feel the push and pull of the magnets. I also did a special magnet board with “Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons” which I got from Anne’s Library Life. While I did the story, I didn’t let the kids see what I was doing and once I had finished telling the story, I turned the board around and let them see the “magic”.

Once we finished the group portion, it was time to move to the station activities.

Station Activities

Before I run down the activity stations, I do want to highlight the products I did wind up purchasing for this program: Magnet Mania Science Kit & Super Magnet Classroom Lab Kit.


Buried Treasure
There are our dishpans again, ha! I buried all of counting chips in some sand from our sand art surplus. The kids used the magnet wands to uncover buried treasure. They also had a great time chaining their counting chips and trying to build the longest chain of chips. I overheard some great conversations about why the chips had magnetic properties when touching the magnet wands from some of the parents!

Magnetic Fishing
I used our Lakeshore Learning set and just let the kids go to town fishing for letters. What I really enjoyed were the interactions and cooperative play that I saw with the kids as they worked together to find the letters to spell their names.


Marble Painting
The biggest undertaking I’ve ever done before. I actually had two of our pages come downstairs with me specifically to supervise this station. I found out all the instructions for this program at Let’s Explore, via Abby the Librarian. Our set-up involved large oval paper plates and some recycled tape rolls to prop them up. To make this an easier station, I pre-cut wax paper sheets that the kids could keep their shapes on and so the pages could easily re-set each paint station for another kid quickly without too much mess.

Magnet Exploration
This was an easy station — I put out all the extra magnets and supplies from the kits and let the kids play. I had quite a few kids that were fascinated with the pull/push aspects and spent a lot of time reversing the polarities to push magnets around the table.


Crazy Hair Station
This station came from Abby at Abby the Librarian and I just absolutely loved it from the very beginning. It was probably the station that I was most looking forward to! Luckily, the kids loved it too. I have a lot of great pictures with their smiling faces and their magnet crazy hair creations. Super simple to cut up some pipe cleaners — I did use the skinny ones, with less fuzz. This is absolutely the station that kids kept coming back to over and over again for one last crazy hair creation!

Take-Home Activities

Since there are not a ton of books for the preschool age on magnets and magnetism, I did skip the display this time around. Instead, I handed out small baggies with supplies to test magnetism at home. I also handed out these take-home packets as they left. Inside there’s an activity page and a coloring page.

Feel free to pin whatever pictures you want, but I did make another Pinterest friendly collage!

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Coming soon…Size Science and Snow Science!

Dinosaur Dance!

The Plan

Books

dinosaurdance

Dinosaur Kisses by David Ezra Stein
Dinosaur Vs. the Library! by Bob Shea
RAWR! By Todd Doodler

Games

Game: “Steg, Steg, T-Rex”
Yep. This is Duck, Duck, Goose. It’s a tried and true game for preschoolers that always leads to lots and lots of giggling.

Game: “Dino Egg Hunt”
We have a ton of leftover eggs from various crafts. I hid ten of each color (pink, blue, green, and purple) and broke the kids into four teams, giving them each a color bucket that corresponded to the egg colors. I asked them to only take their color eggs so that everyone could participate. When their team finished, I awarded them their own dinosaur finger puppets that I got at Target earlier in the summer.

And then, it was time to DANCE!

Dance Mix

dinodancemix

We Are the Dinosaurs (Laurie Berkner)
Dinosaur Dance (We Kids Rock)
Dino-5 Theme Song (Baby Loves Hip Hop Presents The Dino5)
Dinosaurs A to Z (Dinosaur Train)
I Am a Palentologist (They Might Be Giants)

For “We Are the Dinosaurs” and “Dinosaur Dance”, the kids, grown-ups, and I followed the directions in the songs. During the the “Dino-5 Theme Song”, I had the kids dance their finger puppets around. The finger puppets really helped them take a break instead of going full-force. During “Dinosaurs A to Z”, some of the kids joined me in shouting out the letters with me as I tried to make the letter shapes with my body. And for “I Am a Palentologist”, I had scarves for them to dance around with as our final cool-down.

Craft

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And as (almost) always, we did finish with a craft. This was another quick Oriental Trading scratch art kit. The kids enjoyed it, but I did find that a lot of them ran out of time to scratch ALL the color off. (As so many of them try to do!)

How It Went

I had a ridiculous amount of fun at this program and I’m so happy to report that the kids did too. They busted some great moves and had a lot of good times in the air conditioning. I also had a giant blow-up TRex that I got for summer decorations. Afterwards, the kids who wanted photos took photos by him giving me some wonderful photographic memories of this day!

Explore the World: Water

In response to the STEAM movement (and with great thanks to such great inspiration & encouragement from colleagues: Amy, Abby, and Kendra), this past fall I started a STEAM storytime series at the library. This is primarily aimed at preschoolers and their families, registration open to ages 3-7 in our library.

exploretheworld

Books & Group Activities

Opening Activity
Building blocks from Kendra.
“Building Blocks”
(Tune of Good Night Ladies)
Hello ________
Hello ________
Hello ________
Come build something with your blocks!

Books

exploretheworld-water

All the Water In the World by George Ella Lyon
Rain by Manya Stojic
Wow! Ocean! by Robert Neubecker

I started off with “All the Water In the World” since it explains the water cycle in a fun, easy, approachable manner. Then I segued into the kids naming places that had water and I wrote them down on a piece of butcher block paper. I pulled out the different ocean animal flannelboards from the summer of 2010 and after doing the “Five Big Whales” flannelboard, I did some math problems with the animals and the kids. Then we read the last two books and talked about the rain and the different animals that live in the ocean.

Once we finished the group portion, it was time to move to the station activities.

Station Activities


Sink or Float?
I got this amazing idea from Amy’s post on the ALSC blog. I filled up our two dish pans with water and had five items (rubber duck, penny, popsicle stick, Lego, and crayon) out for the kids to toss into the water. This is the station that had the best discussions, in my opinion. Lots of caregivers talking about what the objects were made of and why metal sinks and wood floats. The most interesting thing for the kids were the crayons which floated if you dropped them in gently and sank if you plopped them in.

Does It Dissolve?
I got this idea from Hands On As We Grow. I raided the library’s cabinets of craft materials to sink what we dissolve. In the closets, we had sugar, flour, sprinkles, oatmeal, glitter, and drink mix. The kids loved stirring up their concoctions and I saw several of them stirring frantically trying to get the sprinkles to dissolve.


Water Diffusing Art
We had some leftover color diffusing craft kits from a previous summer reading event in our closets. I know that we got them from S&S Worldwide, but they are no longer available. If you’re doing this program on the cheap, you can also use coffee filters! Kids colored with markers and then used a spray bottle to spread the color. They had a great time with this, and always love taking crafts home.

Make It Melt!
This was be far the messiest station. I had an ice cube for each child. On the top were bowls with warm water, cold water, and salt. And I also had a ton of paper towels. The kids were encouraged to try and melt their ice cubes with the different bowl items. Lots of discovery about the effects of salt & warm water!

Take-Home Activities

I had another book display at the front of the room as always:

I also handed out these take-home packets as they left. Inside, there’s a booklist, an activity, and a coloring page. (They love coloring pages!) I grouped the sheets of “Sink of Float?” in this packet in case you all wanted to see that too.

And, here’s a super Pinnable image for you, if you’ve made it this far!

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I still have three more science programs to write up; keep your eyes out for them!

Kids Art: Flowers!

“Kids Art” was a program created to pair a book with a larger art project for ages 3-7 (and occasionally a few 2-year-old siblings). The library already hosts a monthly craft program for grades 1-6, but I wanted a messy art club for my littles. In the program, I stress a lot about how process is more important than product. Since that’s the goal, I don’t show parents a “sample” completed picture and just explain what the kids are using that day to create. Particularly since we’re almost always painting or getting messy, the goal is for everyone to have a good time!

This was the April edition of Kids Art, which the kids used forks to make flowers! I love the different ways that they went about making their creations. I found out about fork painting from Blog Me Mom — thanks!

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Once they were done with their paintings, I read these garden/flower themed books:

kidsart-flower

A Garden of Opposites by Nancy Davis
Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert
A Closer Look by Mary McCarthy

(I just now realized that we read “Planting a Rainbow” in March Kids Art, too. Whoops! No one said anything if they minded.)