Shake, Shimmy, & Dance: 6/26

For the first time in our library’s history, we ran our own summer reading program — Make Some Noise! What better opportunity to do a bi-weekly music and movement dance party? This program was advertised for ages 0-7 and their families.

shakeshimmyanddance

The Plan

chickachickaboomboom
Book
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.
Besides this being a very familiar book, it also has a great rhythm to the book. Since almost every single person could recite “Chicka Chicka”, I challenged everyone to clap the rhythm with me. That led to a lot of fun and some varied success with keeping a beat! It went about as well as you can imagine — most kids were on the beat, but the few stragglers just couldn’t quite make the connection with the beat.

Props
Shaker Eggs!

The Playlist

Hello & How Are You? — Old Town School of Folk Music
Wiggle Your Lah-De-Dah — Ralph Covert
Silly Dance Contest — Jim Gill
Freeze Ball — Michael Plunkett
I Can Shake My Shaker Egg — Eric Litwin and Michael Levine
The Shaker Hop — Carole Stephens
We’re Going to the Market — Kathy Reid-Naiman
Shake Hands With Friends — Ella Jenkins

How It Went

I did four shaker songs this session instead of the typical three. The kids were so very tired by the end of the day that they had a wonderful clean-up — ha! As always, “Silly Dance Contest” wins a lot of fans and hearts every time I use it. I really love “I Can Shake My Shaker Egg” — the kids enjoyed shaking faster and faster and faster!

(For an example of the Powerpoint and handouts that I made for each Shake, Shimmy please visit the original post.)

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Toddlers: Apples

For more information on how I plan and prepare my toddler storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the repeating extension activities, visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books

apples

Apple Farmer Annie by Monica Wellington*
Pepo and Lolo and the Red Apple by Ana Martin Larranga***
Tap the Magic Tree by Christie Matheson
Ten Red Apples by Virginia Miller**

Early Literacy Tip

Library programs can be considered a child’s first class. Encouraging personal interactions with the group leader help children develop a positive attitude toward learning.

Theme Extension Activities

Flannelboard: Apple BINGO**

Flannelboard: Five Red Apples***

Action Song: “The Leaves Are Falling Down”*
Song: “The Leaves are Falling Down” (Tune of “The Farmer in the Dell”)
The leaves are falling down
The leaves are falling down
Red, yellow, green, and brown
The leaves are falling down
Credit: Preschool Education – Songs: Fall

Fingerplay: “Way Up High In the Apple Tree”***
Way up high in the apple tree (stretch arms up high)
Two red apples smiled at me (hold up two fingers)
I shook that tree as hard as I could (make a shaking motion)
Down came the apples… (make a downward motion)
And mmm, they were good! (smile and rub stomach)
Credit: Childhood

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Open, Shut Them*
  • Put Your Hands Up High**
  • This Is Big***

How It Went

(This fall session I learned to take much better notes, so I’ll break it up by session.)

Tuesday morning
This was the class where we realized that we needed bouncers at the storytime door. We do registration-based storytimes and we had five non-registered kids sneak in to the storytime room. Since we don’t know everyone on sight on the first day, our room was uncomfortably packed. This was my second session and I was so excited to see so many familiar faces. Their favorite activity was Apple BINGO.

Tuesday afternoon
My afternoon session is much more intimate since I only have eleven registered patrons instead of the usual twenty. I really enjoyed getting to have more one-on-one time with each child and adult. This week, they loved “Pepo and Lolo” the most out of all of the activities.

Thursday morning
The puppets were a huge success in “Five Red Apples” — the kids loved when the puppets “ate” the apples. My adults were great during “Ten Red Apples” as we counted along, with lots of voices chiming in. After a summer of no toddler times, the kids were SO HAPPY to see bubbles again. They was such great bubble popping enthusiasm!

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ALSC: Rotating Storytime Duties!

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I wrote about our rotating storytime session “Sunset Stories” last June on the ALSC blog. Click on over.

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Flannel Friday: Five Dancing Ballerinas

Once upon a time, I did a dance themed storytime. I found some clip art, laminated the ballerinas and went with it:

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Three years later, I stumbled upon this pin on Pinterest which I immediately pinned and downloaded the template from Ei Menina! (The entire site is in Portuguese, but if you scroll down or search “bailarina” you’ll get to the template.)

And then, the Blackhawks made the playoffs this past spring. And I needed something to do while I “watched” the games since playoffs make me nervous. So I made these felt ballerinas to distract myself.

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And I took some close-up, detail pictures too:

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This is the rhyme that I used with this flannelboard:

“Five Dancing Ballerinas”
Five dancing ballerinas
Prancing on their toes
They twirl and spin and jump
Then off the stage she goes (count down)


Laura is hosting the round-up today! You can also check out our website, Pinterest, or Facebook!

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Babies: Bedtime & Bathtime

For more information on how I plan and prepare my baby storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the baby rhymes/bounces/lifts/etc., visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books
For baby time, my library passes out individual copies of board books to each caregiver/child pair. I typically keep two or three to the side of me in case a baby tries to grab my copy. I read face out; caregivers read to their children.

babies-bedbathtime

Baby’s Bath by Judy Nayer**
Goodnight Faces by Lucy Schultz**
Pajama Time by Sandra Boynton*

Early Literacy Tip

You don’t actually need to read boos aloud to your children in order for them to benefit. Simply looking at and talking about books helps children love them!


Flannelboard: Shape Game

Since we were talking all about getting ready for bed and sleep, I decided to use one of the stars from my “Four Little Stars” set. Parents immediately got it and I threw in a surprise song of “Twinkle Twinkle” once I revealed it.

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Cheek Chin**
  • Open, Shut Them*
  • Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear**
  • Tick, Tock**
  • Tiny Little Babies**

How It Went

Tuesday morning
For this storytime, I had a co-worker come and in and observe how I do baby storytimes. I feel like I’ve grown so much in the past six weeks, I’m really glad she asked later on in the session rather than at the beginning. I introduced one of my best bounces this week: Tiny Little Babies. The group really enjoyed it and I think it reinvigorated storytime!

Thursday morning
We had a great session today. I love the book “Baby’s Bath” — each tab helps to turn pages. A lot of babies were turning their own pages for this one. And “Goodnight Faces” is such a crowd pleaser! I really think that peek-a-boo/mask/mirror books are some of the best things for this age group in storytime.

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Toddler Fall 2014 Fingerplays, Rhymes, & Songs

To read more about how I plan and prepare my Toddler Storytimes, please visit this post.

toddlerstorytimes

Each session, I pick some extension activities to repeat from week to week. Most of the time these have nothing to do with my theme of the day and just allow me to add more movement or songs if that’s what the toddlers need that week. Of course, I don’t use every activity every week. I’ll note in the individual theme summaries which activities I used. These are the activities that I had planned for Fall 2014.

Action Rhyme: “Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear”
Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn around
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the ground
Teddy bear, teddy bear, reach up high
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the sky
Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch your knees
Teddy bear, teddy bear, sit down please
Credit: Childhood

Action Rhyme: “This Is Big”
This is big, big, big (stretch hands far to sides)
This is small, small, small (cup hands together)
This is short, short, short (hold palms close vertically)
This is tall, tall, tall (hold palms far apart vertically)
This is fast, fast, fast (roll hands quickly)
This is slow, slow, slow (roll hands slowly)
This is yes, yes, yes (nod head)
This is no, no, no (shake head)
Credit: Mel’s Desk

Action Song: “My Thumbs Are Going to Wiggle”
Tune: The Bear Went Over the Mountain
My thumbs are starting to wiggle,
My thumbs are starting to wiggle,
My thumbs are starting to wiggle,
And now so are my hands/arms/toes/feet…
Body is starting to wiggle: around and around and around!
(Sing about other body parts as wiggles spread!)
Credit: Jbrary

Action Song: “Put Your Hands Up High”
Tune: Do Your Ears Hang Low
Put your hands up high, put your hands down low,
Put your hands in the middle and wiggle just so.
Put your elbows in front, put your elbows in back
Put your elbows to the side and quack, quack, quack!
Credit: Jbrary

Action Song: “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” (three ways)
Row, row, row your boat
gently down the stream
Merrily, merrily, merrily
Life is but a dream.
Extensions:
quickly down the stream (row faster, sing faster)
slowly down the stream (row slower, sing slower)
Credit: Childhood; Jbrary for the extensions

Action Song: “Wake Up Toes”
Wake up toes, wake up toes
Wake up toes and wiggle, wiggle, wiggle
Wake up toes, wake up toes
Wake up and wiggle in the morning.
Also: hands, ears, knees, fingers, hips, etc.
Credit: Jbrary

Fingerplay: “Dance Your Fingers Up”**
Dance your fingers up, dance your fingers down
Dance your fingers to the side, dance them all around
Dance them on your shoulders, dance them on you head
Dance them on your tummy, and put them all to bed
Credit: Best Kids Book Site (Site appears to be completely reorganized…)

Lift/Song: “The Elevator Song”
Oh the city is great and the city is grand
There’s a whole lot of people
on a little piece of land
And we live way up on the 57th floor
and this is what we do when we open the door.
We take the elevator up and the elevator down,
take the elevator up, take the elevator down
Take the elevator up and the elevator down
And we turn around.
Credit: Jbrary

Song: “Open, Shut Them”
Open, shut them, open, shut them
Give a little clap, clap, clap
Open, shut them, open, shut them
Lay them in your lap, lap, lap
Creep them, crawl them, creep them, crawl them
Right up to your chin, chin, chin
Open up your little mouth
But do not let them in, in, in!
Credit: My co-worker Sarah

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ALSC: Organizing Storytime!

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In May, I wrote about organizing storytime and its materials on the ALSC blog, including links to some solutions. Check it out over here.

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Flannel Friday Guest Post!

guestpostFF

Welcome to Flannel Friday’s FOURTH Birthday celebration! Without further ado, I am so happy to have Melendra guest posting about a folder story that is going to rock everyone’s socks off!

My Many Colored Capes. . .Folder Story
Guest post by Melendra Sutliff Sanders

capes1My folder story is based on a flannel board script that I discovered recently from Carissa Christner. Since my library system is using the Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP) theme, “Every Hero Has a Story,” the script is perfect for our summer reading programs. However, I have a love of folder stories, and I thought this rhyme would be perfect in that format. For anyone who hasn’t used or seen a folder story, they are an easy alternative to flannel board stories. They are perfect for outreach because you don’t have to carry a flannel board to tell them and they are light.

capes2Now that I had a good superhero rhyme, I needed some art. Luckily, the CSLP materials come with clip art, and I found the perfect image. But, I wanted color, so I saved it into Paint and went to work. I had to make up my own skin color, but otherwise, I stuck with the pre-programmed colors in Paint. I did have to connect the dog’s back leg to his body in order to avoid recoloring all the background the same color as the dog.

capes3It ended up looking like this. I considered using more colors, but I wanted to stay sort of basic so the cape colors would pop more during the telling of the rhyme. Since the first cape color is red, I thought that was a good place to start. I printed the image on white cardstock because I will keep it on the front of the folder for the final piece. If I’m only using the image as a template, then I would print on paper to make cutting easier.

capes4The next step is cutting the holes in the folder. To do this, I start out by taping the image to the front of a regular file folder using permanent double-sided tape. One trick I’ve learned is that I don’t want to cut through the tape, so I make sure that I’m placing the tape in the center of what will be cut out—to hold the pieces in place and keep them from crumpling while I cut. If I plan to use the image on the completed folder (and not just as a pattern), I also place tape around all the sections that I’m going to cut. This keeps the paper from moving while I cut out sections. If I plan to keep the image on the front of the folder, I use a lot of tape. Then using an Exact-o knife, I cut out all of the cape, both the black under section and the white top section. I left a black outline around the entire thing.

Once the folder is cut, I get my paper. First I print my script. I always modify the script so that the name of the color or pattern I’m talking about is printed in that color. This allows me to glance at the script rather than read it while I’m presenting. I also make the script font as large as I can while still keeping the story or rhyme fit on one sheet of paper. This allows me to tape the script to the back of the folder instead of having to keep it separately. This keeps them from getting separated from each other, and it makes telling the folder story easier too.

capes5I always use construction paper or cardstock inside my folders to make the folder story more durable. I’ve also started putting tape tabs on the ends of the paper to make them easier to pull out as I recite the rhyme. The first sheet of paper has a tape tab at the bottom, the second sheet of paper has a tape tab that is a step above the first sheet’s tab. This helps me grab the right sheet of paper without having to look at the edge of the folder the entire time I’m presenting the folder story. I also tape the final sheet of paper to the back of the folder, no risk of accidentally pulling that last piece out!

capes6For this particular rhyme, the final sheet of paper needs to be rainbow colored. I don’t have any rainbow colored paper, so I found a rainbow clipart image in Publisher and printed out the page. Finally, I place all the pages inside the folder and tape one of the edges. There’s are two tricks to this too. 1) Although with the paper in the folder you have to be careful not to accidentally tape the pages, if it’s not in the folder the spacing can be off and it is hard to slide the paper in and out or get them to rest flush with the lower edge. 2) Test out to see which hand you are most comfortable holding the folder in and tape the side that is farther away from you. This ensures that you can easily hold the folder and pull the paper out comfortably.

Here’s the finished folder front and back.

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capes8

Carissa Christner from Library Makers gave us permission to post the rhyme that she wrote: My Many Colored Capes.

If you have any questions, you can contact Melendra at msanders[at]nckls[dot]org


Mollie is hosting the round-up today! You can also check out our website, Pinterest, or Facebook!

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Babies: Food

For more information on how I plan and prepare my baby storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the baby rhymes/bounces/lifts/etc., visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books
For baby time, my library passes out individual copies of board books to each caregiver/child pair. I typically keep two or three to the side of me in case a baby tries to grab my copy. I read face out; caregivers read to their children.

babies-food

Max’s Breakfast by Rosemary Wells*
Pat-a-Cake by Tony Kenyon**
Yummy Yucky by Leslie Patricelli**

Early Literacy Tip

When you give your children positive reinforcement by clapping or telling them that they did a great job, you are encouraging them to act both independently and cooperatively.


Flannelboard: Shape Game

I used the red apple from my “Five Little Apples” set. I flipped it down so the babies just saw a bright red, full apple. I went with red since I figured it would be a great contrast on our black board, but also because it was likely the most recognizable apple color.

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Icka Bicka Soda Cracker**
  • Milkshake, Milkshake**
  • Pat-a-Cake*
  • Popcorn, Popcorn**
  • A Smooth Road**

How It Went

Tuesday morning
Food is such a fun theme for babies! They are just starting to discover food and this was a great way to explore it. “Milkshake” was easily today’s biggest hits. I brought out shaker eggs (which I don’t always do in baby storytime), but I wanted to give the babies a treat today. They definitely tried to “eat” the eggs!

Thursday morning
This is the class where I decided I wanted to do some more research and add more rhymes to my baby repertoire. My wiggly babies just wanted to sing more songs and do more bounces/lifts. At the very last minute, I threw in a “Tick Tock” to keep them entertained. But we went to bubble a little early because the kiddos were so restless. Immediately afterwards, I began to search the internet for more movement activities to memorize!

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Shake, Shimmy, & Dance: 6/24

For the first time in our library’s history, we ran our own summer reading program — Make Some Noise! What better opportunity to do a bi-weekly music and movement dance party? This program was advertised for ages 0-7 and their families.

shakeshimmyanddance

The Plan

canyoumakeascaryface
Book
Can You Make a Scary Face? by Jan Thomas
This book is a pure crowd pleaser. I love watching the kids swat at themselves and blow furiously trying to get the bug out. It gave us a great warm-up and I love the first few pages of “get up” and “sit down” that really get a lot of laughs from both caregivers and kids!

Props
Bells!

The Playlist

Hello & How Are You? — Old Town School of Folk Music
I Really Love to Dance — Laurie Berkner
Jump Up, Turn Around — Jim Gill
Play Your Instruments — Ella Jenkins
Oh Children Ring Your Bells & Ring Them On the Floor — Kathy Reid-Naiman
Dance Around — Ralph Covert
Shake Hands With Friends — Ella Jenkins

How It Went

This was the session where I started noticing that the adults were having just as much fun as the kids. The opening song “Hello & How Are You?” is in English, French, and Spanish and I was so pleased to hear adults singing along with me. It only took five sessions, but they learned it! As previously mentioned, I am very used to being the only one in the room singing, so this was a treat for me!

(For an example of the Powerpoint and handouts that I made for each Shake, Shimmy please visit the original post.)

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