Flannel Friday: Braille Counting/Match

When I was originally brainstorming for my Languages storytime, I wanted to incorporate as many languages as possible. While Braille isn’t classified as a language, but rather as a writing system (from my understanding), I still wanted to include it to talk to my kiddos about the different way people communicate.

To make this flannelboard, I used puffy paint to create the raised dots. I tried to use the same color puffy paint as I did for the matching felt number so that it was easier for the kiddos.

I passed out the numbers set and had the Braille set on the board. I asked if anyone had the number one and the child who did would (hopefully) come up and be able to run their hand over the Braille number one. And so forth. If I had had over ten kids at this storytime, I would have passed out all of the pieces. Then I would have asked the child with number one to come up and put it on the board. Then I would have asked if someone had a dot piece with hot pink paint. Both kids would then be able to touch the Braille piece for number one.

I used a posterboard set of numbers as my template for the numbers. Other than that, I freehanded black squares.

The kids were very excited to get to come up and pet the flannelboard (which is one of their favorite activities). And they did a great job matching the matches!


Nikki is hosting the round-up today! You can also check out our website, Pinterest, or Facebook!

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Babies: Bears

For more information on how I plan and prepare my baby storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the baby rhymes/bounces/lifts/etc., visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books
For baby time, my library passes out individual copies of board books to each caregiver/child pair. I typically keep two or three to the side of me in case a baby tries to grab my copy. I read face out; caregivers read to their children.

babies-bears

Brown Bear, Brown Bear by Bill Martin Jr.**
Corduroy’s Day by Lisa McCue*
Mr. Bear Says Goodnight by Debi Gliori**

Early Literacy Tip

It’s only natural for babies to chew on books. They chew everything because they explore using their mouths.


Flannelboard: Shape Game

This little guy came from my “Ten Teddy Bears” set. I took special care to hide him in my bag immediately after finding him because of his googly eyes. (This was an older flannel from before I was doing baby and toddler only storytimes.)

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Grr Grr Went the Big Brown Bear**
  • I Bounce You Here**
  • Open, Shut Them*
  • Round and Round the Garden**
  • Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear**

How It Went

Tuesday morning
Today’s group was so fascinated with the brown bear puppet that I brought. Several of the babies just kept petting him once I was done with “Grr Grr Went the Big Brown Bear”, which was a nice tactile thing for them to play with. I actually went and put on a CD with “The Bear Went Over the Mountain” so they could keep squishing him.

Thursday morning
The best activity for this group was definitely “Brown Bear, Brown Bear”. Our parents and caregivers love this book. So many of them have it memorized. And while I often want to introduce new materials to parents, if a material works with this age group, I will use it and use it often!

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Toddlers: Animal Sounds

For more information on how I plan and prepare my toddler storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the repeating extension activities, visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books

toddler-animalsounds

Hello Day! by Anita Lobel
Moo Baa La La La! by Sandra Boynton
Peek-a-Zoo! by Marie Torres Cimarusti**
Say Hello Like This by Mary Murphy**

Early Literacy Tip

Children love being able to identify animals and imitate the sounds they make. Use some stuffed animals and make up new verses for each one. What sounds would they make?

Theme Extension Activities

Flannelboard: “Seals on the Bus”**

Puppets: “There’s Something In My Garden”**
There’s something in my garden
Now what can it be?
There’s something in my garden
That I can’t really see.
Hear its funny sound…
RIBBIT RIBBIT RIBBIT
A frog is what I found!
RIBBIT RIBBIT RIBBT
(SQUEAK SQUEAK SQUEAK, A mouse is what I found! / CAW CAW CAW, A crow is what I found! / THUMP THUMP THUMP, A rabbit is what I found!)
Credit: SurLaLune Storytime

Song: “You Can Hear…”**
(Tune: She’ll Be Coming Round the Mountain)
You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo, ROAR! ROAR!
You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo, ROAR! ROAR!
You can hear the lions roaring, you can hear the lions roaring
You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo! ROAR! ROAR!
(Elephants trumpeting, zebra braying, monkey eeking)
Credit: Perpetual Preschool

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Dance Your Fingers**
  • Open, Shut Them*
  • This Is Big**

How It Went

I had a lot of fun planning this theme since I had never done an animal sounds storytime before. (I’m trying to repeat some classic themes, but I don’t want to just repeat exactly what I had done at my old library at my new library.) My favorite part is either class was when I opened up to suggestions after “You Can Hear” and had to come up with a dolphin sound and a raccoon sound. Dolphins clearly whistle and raccoon tap on garbage cans, right? Everyone’s favorite was “Peek-a-Zoo”, because it’s awesome and has pop-up flaps.

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Flannel Friday: Superheroes!

Up, up, and away! Superheroes!

I bought this clipart on Etsy from revidevi, which is one of my favorite clip art stores. I made sure to get clipart that had both female and male superheroes, and I really liked how preschool-like the kids were.

I used this in Superheroes storytime with the song “Ten Little Heroes” modified from a childhood song that I’m sure you all know and recognize:

One little, two little, three little heroes
Four little, five little, six little heroes
Seven little, eight little, nine little heroes
Ten heroes ready to fly!
(count down)

or you could use it with this fingerplay that I got from Jbrary:

Five superheroes ready to fly,
Here comes a villain. Stop that guy!
This superhero can save the day.
Off he/she flies – up, up, and away!

Either rhyme/song you chose, it will be sure to be an excellent time!


Katie is hosting the round-up today! You can also check out our website, Pinterest, or Facebook!

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Babies: Animals Sounds

For more information on how I plan and prepare my baby storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the baby rhymes/bounces/lifts/etc., visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books
For baby time, my library passes out individual copies of board books to each caregiver/child pair. I typically keep two or three to the side of me in case a baby tries to grab my copy. I read face out; caregivers read to their children.

babies-animalsounds

Clifford’s Animal Sounds by Norman Bridwell*
Cow Moo Me by Stephen Losordo**
Moo Baa La La La by Sandra Boynton**

Early Literacy Tip

Animal sounds are your baby’s first steps to saying words!


Flannelboard: Shape Game

I took the cow from my “Mrs. Wishy-Washy” set and kept her hidden, with her clean side showing. Now that this is the third week, the babies have started to anticipate the shape game and immediately walk up closer after we sing “Hands Are Clapping”. I love that they are excited about this game!

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Baa Baa Black Sheep**
  • I Bounce You Here**
  • Open, Shut Them**
  • Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear*

How It Went

Tuesday morning
There was a lot of really good animal sounds from my caregivers in this storytime. Quite a few babies answered back with their own sounds! This was the storytime where one of my families asked me to use some recorded music since my co-worker had done that in the past. It was an easy addition to add, so I did. I still dislike fiddling with the CD player though. I feel like it disrupts my storytime flow, but I’m sure I’ll get better with practice.

Thursday morning
Today’s group really enjoyed the Boynton title; I could tell that there were a lot of fans when some of the babies vocalized once I passed the books out. I have a helper baby in this group who loves to collect everyone’s board book copy. It’s the sweetest thing ever, but I have to be careful that no one bursts into tears if she takes their book.

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Shake, Shimmy, & Dance: 6/19

For the first time in our library’s history, we ran our own summer reading program — Make Some Noise! What better opportunity to do a bi-weekly music and movement dance party? This program was advertised for ages 0-7 and their families.

shakeshimmyanddance

The Plan

dancingfeet
Book
Dancing Feet by Lindsey Craig
This has been a favorite book of mine since my last library. I love that it’s a guessing game and it was very fun to have the kids make the feet noises with me. I did have a few preschoolers who were trying so hard to answer before everyone else though. I had to ask them to let the littler kids have a chance too!

Props
Bells!

The Playlist

Hello & How Are You? — Old Town School of Folk Music
Jump Up, Turn Around — Jim Gill
The Goldfish — Laurie Berkner Band
Dance Around — Ralph Covert
All You Pretty Babies — Caspar Babypants
I Love to Hear the Sounds — Kathy Reid-Naiman
Sunny Day — Elizabeth Mitchell
Shake Hands With Friends — Ella Jenkins

How It Went

The kids LOVED “The Goldfish” and “Jump Up, Turn Around” — the definite favorites of the day. We played with hand bells during “Dance Around”, “All You Pretty Babies”, and “I Love to Hear the Sounds”. The bells were not a super big hit in terms of the props. I don’t know if it’s because I saved the bells as the last introduction and the competition (shakers/parachute/scarves) were the better draw. “Sunny Day” didn’t really work as a cool-down song but has had great success in our weekly evening storytimes.

(For an example of the Powerpoint and handouts that I made for each Shake, Shimmy please visit the original post.)

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Toddlers: Dogs

For more information on how I plan and prepare my toddler storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the repeating extension activities, visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books

toddler-dogs

Dog’s Colorful Day by Emma Dodd**
One, Two, That’s My Shoe! by Alison Murray
Where’s Spot? by Eric Hill**

Early Literacy Tip

It takes longer for children who are learning to talk to respond to our questions. Wait 5-12 seconds to give them a chance to respond.

Theme Extension Activities

Flannelboard: “BINGO”**

Finger Puppets: “Five Little Puppies”**

Song: “How Much Is That Doggie?”**
How much is that doggie in the window? (arf! arf!)
The one with the waggley tail
How much is that doggie in the window? (arf! arf!)
I do hope that doggie’s for sale
Credit: Childhood

Song: “The Puppy Pokey”*
You put your small paw in, you put your small paw out.
You put your small paw in, and you shake it all about.
You do the Puppy Pokey, and you turn yourself around.
That’s what it’s all about.
You put your cold nose in, you put your cold nose out.
You put your cold nose in, and you snuffle all about.
You do the Puppy Pokey, and you turn yourself around.
That’s what it’s all about.
You put your floppy ears in, you put your floppy ears out.
You put your floppy ears in, and you shake them all about.
You do the Puppy Pokey, and you turn yourself around.
That’s what it’s all about.
You put your wagging tail in, you put your wagging tail out.
You put your wagging tail in, and you shake it all about.
You do the Puppy Pokey, and you turn yourself around.
That’s what it’s all about.
You put your puppy self in, you put your puppy self out.
You put your puppy self in, and you shake it all about.
You do the Puppy Pokey, and you turn yourself around.
That’s what it’s all about.
Credit: Addison Public Library

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Dance Your Fingers*
  • Open, Shut Them**

How It Went

This week was spring break week and I had a lot of older siblings attend storytime with their younger siblings. (Generally, we have a no siblings policy, but relax that on school holidays.) This was a good theme for both toddlers and older siblings. For whatever reason, both Tuesday and Thursday were nearly identical in what I used — which rarely happens. Both group enjoyed both books and I would have a hard time picking which was their favorite.

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Introducing…

Step Up Readers: a website devoted to all things beginning readers. And that’s all I’m going to say here. If you want to know more, click on over!

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Flannel Friday: Where Is Truck?

Today, I have a set of props to go with a Thumbkin piggyback song!

20140722-221328-80008030.jpg

These are laminated pieces clipart, backed by construction paper. I’ve used these for years in different kinds of “things that go” storytimes. I had two of each card and hide them both behind my back as I sing:

Tune: Where is Thumbkin?
Where is pick-up truck? Where is pick-up truck?
Here I am. Here I am.
How are you today, sir? Very well, I thank you.
Drive away. Drive away.
(Tow truck, dump truck, moving truck, firetruck)

If I were making them now, I might choose instead to do a set with photographs so that kids could see the real trucks instead of the clipart ones.


Kelly is hosting the round-up today! You can also check out our website, Pinterest, or Facebook!

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Babies: Body

For more information on how I plan and prepare my baby storytimes, check out this introduction post. And for a complete list of the baby rhymes/bounces/lifts/etc., visit this post. I starred the materials used in the plan; multiple stars indicate use for more than one session.

The Plan

Books
For baby time, my library passes out individual copies of board books to each caregiver/child pair. I typically keep two or three to the side of me in case a baby tries to grab my copy. I read face out; caregivers read to their children.

babies-body

Show Me by Tom Tracy
Tickle Time by Sandra Boynton
Where Is Baby’s Bellybutton? by Karen Katz

Early Literacy Tip

Today, I encourage you to point to or gently touch the body parts on your child when we talk about them. This will help them understand that the words we’re saying represent their bodies.


Flannelboard: Shape Game

I was going to use the big hand from “All the Little Germs”, but it was way too big to fit underneath any of my shapes. So, I quickly cut out the approximation of a baby’s hand out of felt. Caregivers immediately started pointing to their baby’s hand when the little felt hand came out!

Repeating Extension Activities

  • Cheek Chin**
  • Open, Shut Them**
  • Round the World**
  • A Smooth Road*
  • This Little Piggy**
  • Tick, Tock**

How It Went

Tuesday morning
Is there anything better than hearing babies laugh as we read “Tickle Time”? (It’s not a trick question. The answer is: no, there is nothing better than babies giggling.) I chose to do a lot of repeating activities that talk about/mention body parts and paired with the literacy tip, it really helped caregives interact with the babies!

Thursday morning
This was my first time meeting this group since I was at PLA last Thursday and what a sweet set of babies! I had two of the little girls crawl into my lap and this was my first time ever seeing them! We don’t start teaching stranger danger for a while, right?

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